Spring Street traffic analysis

The following traffic analysis was conducted on Wednesday the 20th of August and Sunday the 24th of August 2014. Collated over 6 x 1 hour observation periods, the data generated represents the total number of cars, bicycles and pedestrians that utilise Spring Street, Fitzroy.

20141002 spring street traffic #1

The observation periods were:

  • Weekday morning peak
  • Weekday day
  • Weekday evening peak
  • Weekday night
  • Weekend day
  • Weekend night

20141002 spring street traffic #2

The information collated included:

  • Number of cars passing through the street (direction, speed, time spent)
  • Number of bicycles passing through the street (direction, speed, time spent)
  • Number of pedestrians passing through the street (direction, speed, time spent)
  • Number of cars, bicycles and pedestrians arriving, departing, bypassing the street

Weekday 7am-8am

Weekday morning peak
Wednesday 20th August 2014
7 – 8am
8 degrees

Weekday 12pm-1pm

Weekday day
Wednesday 20th August 2014
12 – 1pm
12 degrees

Weekday 5pm-6pm

Weekday evening peak
Wednesday 20th August 2014
5 – 6pm
10 degrees

Weekday 9pm-10pm

Weekday night
Wednesday 20th August 2014
9 – 10pm
8 degrees

Weekend 12pm-1pm

Weekend day
Sunday 24th August 2014
12 – 1pm
18 degrees

Weekend 5pm-6pm

Weekend night
Sunday 24th August 2014
5 – 6pm
12 degrees

Spring Street : Rose Street

The data collated supports preliminary analysis undertook of the street. Worth noting is the glaring disparity between traffic passing though the street compared to traffic arriving at and departing the street. This is something that I want to further explore.

Spring Street |

Observations:

  • Spring Street is primarily used as a thoroughfare for cars, bicycles and pedestrians.
  • Traffic conditions are minimal due to the narrow nature of the street.
  • Cars, bicycles and pedestrians that access the street move through at a slow rate.
  • High volumes of traffic bypass the street via either Rose or Kerr Streets.
  • The Rose Street Market generates exceedingly high volumes of traffic on weekends.
  • Residential access requirements is minimal as there are only 8 residents on the street.
  • The majority of cars passing through the street are searching for a parking spot.
  • Businesses that back onto the street only use it for pickup and drop off (minimal).
  • There is a sense of disconnection from surrounding streets.

Image sources

  1. Spring Street / Kerr Street, this and subsequent images copyright by author.
  2. Site plan.
  3. Weekday morning peak.
  4. Weekday day.
  5. Weekday evening peak.
  6. Weekday night.
  7. Weekend day.
  8. Weekend night.
  9. Spring Street / Rose Street.
  10. Spring Street.
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Lesney Street traffic conclusions

Traffic surveys of Lesney Street, Richmond, identified three different paths for traffic movement through the street. The overall observation shows that the majority of traffic uses Lesney Street as a thoroughfare, compared with arriving at or departing the street.

20141002 lesney traffic conclusions #1

The diagram shows the three different paths of traffic used by cars in Lesney Street, a one way residential street. Route A travels part of the way through Lesney Street and makes a left turn onto Brighton Street; Route B travels along Lesney Street to access Church Street; and Route C arrives into Lesney Street from Brighton Street to access Church Street.

20141002 lesney traffic conclusions #2

This diagram compares the weekday and weekend use of Lesney Street by cars, bicycles, motorcycles and pedestrians (including with prams and pets, and using the pedestrian foot bridge). We can see that the majority of cars take Route C from Brighton Street (71% on weekdays; 87% on weekends). We can also see that the majority of pedestrians take Route B (91% on weekdays; 97% on weekends).

20141002 lesney traffic conclusions #3

This diagram shows the average amount of time each mode of transport spends in Lesney Street and the speed at which they travel.

20141002 lesney traffic conclusions #4
Weekday activities

Based on observations, during weekdays:

  • Majority of pedestrians using Lesney Street are residents who walk alone to and from work in formal attire.
  • In the late evening, pedestrian traffic is significantly heavier heading to and from Church and Swan Streets. Pedestrians walking back are seen carrying their groceries from the nearest Coles supermarket.
  • In off-peak periods, one car journey was observed every 14 seconds travelling at an average speed of 30 km/h.
  • Bicycle usage is low in both peak and off-peak periods.
  • Pedestrian use is consistent throughout the day.

20141002 lesney traffic conclusions #5

During the weekend:

  • Pedestrian are generally in small groups: families and couples.
  • In the late evening, car traffic is significantly heavier for both Route A and Route C.
  • Pedestrian traffic is equally heavy in the morning, afternoon and evening. Pedestrians regularly park their cars along Lesney and Brighton Streets to walk to Church Street for shopping.
  • One car journey was observed every 13 seconds travelling at an average speed of 40 km/h.
  • Bicycle usage increases slightly in the afternoon.
  • Pedestrian use is consistent throughout the day.
  • In the evening, cars speed up significantly and are mostly taxis.

A summary of conclusions that have come from the above analysis is as follows:

  • Lesney Street is subject to light car traffic.
  • Car usage is significantly higher along Route B and Route C. Cars use the street as a thoroughfare from Brighton Street to Church Street.
  • Car speed is approximately 40 km/h, which is fast for a one way, residential street.
  • Cars that arrive into Lesney Street are parked for shopping along Church Street.
  • Pedestrians use the pedestrian bridge predominantly to access Swan Street.
  • Lesney Street is well used by pedestrians throughout the day.

Image sources

  1. Traffic routes, this and subsequent images copyright of author.
  2. Traffic comparison between weekdays and weekends.
  3. Average travel times.
  4. Weekday analysis.
  5. Weekend analysis.

Lesney Street traffic analysis

The following traffic analysis was conducted during a series of one hour observations of Lesney Street, Richmond.

20141004 lesney street traffic #1

The observations were made during the following periods:

  • Weekday morning peak
  • Weekday afternoon
  • Weekday evening peak
  • Weekend morning
  • Weekend afternoon
  • Weekend evening

The following data was collected:

  • Number of cars, bicycles, pedestrians and pedestrians using the pedestrian foot bridge (including pedestrians accompanied by prams or dogs).
  • Direction of travel along Lesney Street.
  • Number of arrivals into and departures from properties on the street.
  • Average time taken to travel along Lesney Street.

20141002 lesney street traffic #4

Weekday morning peak
Friday 22nd August 2014
8 – 9am
10 degrees
Average car speed: 20 – 40 km/h

20141002 lesney street traffic #5

Weekday afternoon
Thursday 21st August 2014
5 – 6pm
16 degrees
Average car speed: 20 – 40km/h

20141002 lesney street traffic #6

Weekday evening peak
Thursday 21st August 2014
7 – 8pm
12 degrees
Average car speed: 30km/h

20141002 lesney street traffic #7

Weekend morning
Saturday 23rd August 2014
10 – 11am
14 degrees
Average car speed: 20km/h

20141002 lesney street traffic #8

Weekend afternoon
Saturday 23rd August 2014
3 – 4pm
18 degrees
Average car speed: 20 – 40km/h

20141002 lesney street traffic #9

Weekend evening
Saturday 23rd August 2014
6 – 7pm
15 degrees
Average car speed: 30 – 50km/h


Image sources

  1. Lesney Street, this and subsequent images copyright the author.
  2. Weekday morning peak.
  3. Weekday afternoon.
  4. Weekday evening peak.
  5. Weekend morning.
  6. Weekend afternoon.
  7. Weekend evening.

Burnley Street traffic analysis

20141002 burnley street traffic #1
Existing routes of the east and west halves of Burnley Street.
20141002 burnley street traffic #2
Traffic along Madden Grove is double that of Burnley Street.
20141002 burnley street traffic #3
Surveys of car, bicycle and pedestrian traffic per hour along East Burnley Street.
20141002 burnley street traffic #4
Surveys of car, bicycle and pedestrian traffic per hour along West Burnley Street

Broad observations made include:

  • Both section of Burnley Street has higher car traffic than bicycle and pedestrian traffic.
  • Cars take on average 15 seconds to travel the length of the street.
  • Due to the lack of bicycles lanes and high car traffic, bicycle travel slowly and carefully through the street.
  • The industrial side of the street has many car visitors through weekdays and on Saturday mornings. Visitors spend on average 15 minutes on site.
  • At night, almost no bicycles and pedestrians pass through the industrial side of the street.

20141002 burnley street traffic #5

Although there is less traffic on weekends, the types of activities taking place on the street are more fruitful than on weekdays.

20141002 burnley street traffic #6
Car parking.

There are approximately 80 unmarked car park spaces available on site:

  • 38x all-day parking spaces along East Burnley Street.
  • 14x four hour parking under the bridge.
  • 27x four hour parking along West Burnley Street.

20141002 burnley street traffic #7

  • An average of 5 cars consistently park on site during weekdays and the weekend, they most likely belong to the residents.
  • Around 43 cars park on the street all day on weekdays until late afternoon, they are likely local workers / people who drive to the station to take the train into the city.
  • The car parking spaces are relatively empty and flexible during weekend.
  • However, the car parking space are busy when there is an AFL or cricket match at night, likely used by people parking close to Burnley train station to then catch the train to the MCG.

Image sources

  1. Existing routes, this and subsequent images copyright of author.
  2. Busyness of the streets.
  3. Traffic along East Burnley Street.
  4. Traffic along West Burnley Street.
  5. Actions on streets.
  6. Car parking.
  7. Use of car parking spaces.

Lulie Street traffic conclusions

The traffic survey undertaken for Lulie Street, Abbotsford, identified three significant patterns.

First, the majority of the traffic using Lulie Street passes through, compared with arriving at or departing the street. Only a small percentage of vehicle, bicycle and pedestrian journeys start or finish within the site area.

  • During peak periods, 94% of all traffic passes through the street. This equates to 546 of 582 vehicles, bicycles and pedestrians each hour.
  • During off-peak periods, 82% of all traffic passes through. This equates to 166 of 202 vehicles, bicycles and pedestrians each hour.

20141002 lulie traffic conclusions #1

Secondly, the predominant mode of transport using the street is the car.

  • During peak periods, 65% of all traffic, whether passing through, arriving at or departing the street are cars. This equates to 378 of 582 total users each hour.
  • During off-peak periods, 56% of all traffic, whether passing through, arriving at or departing the street are cars. This equates to 114 of 202 total users each hour.

20141002 lulie traffic conclusions #2

Thirdly, there is very little difference between the volumes of traffic travelling south towards Johnston Street and north towards the Eastern Freeway. Peak and off-peak times demonstrate relatively even percentages of traffic travelling in both directions.

  • During peak periods, 58% of all traffic travels south towards Johnston Street and 42% north towards the Eastern Freeway.
  • During off-peak periods, 46% of all traffic travels south towards Johnston Street and 54% north towards the Eastern Freeway.

20141002 lulie traffic conclusions #3

The following conclusions were established based on my observations:

  • There is a significantly lower volume of vehicles and bicycles arriving at or departing Lulie Street, as opposed to passing through. This indicates that Lulie Street is primarily used as a thoroughfare. Perhaps the street is used as an alternative route to avoid the traffic congestion on Hoddle Street.
  • Despite Lulie Street’s close proximity to Victoria Park train station, the street is dominated by vehicle use with cars being the most common form of transport along the street.
  • The volumes of traffic travelling towards Johnston Street and the Eastern Freeway are similar, supporting the notion that Lulie Street is often used as a rat run.
  • Vehicle, bicycle and pedestrian movement through the street is considerably higher during peak times than off-peak times. Based on my observations, around 8.00 – 9.30am would be considered morning peak and around 4.30 – 6.00pm evening peak. The majority of vehicles that arrive at the street park along it or in the $4 per day car park in the morning and then catch the train.

Image sources

  1. Traffic arriving, passing through and departing, this and subsequent images copyright the author.
  2. Volumes of bicycles, vehicles and pedestrians.
  3. Direction of traffic flow.

Lulie Street traffic analysis

The following data was collected during 6 x 1 hour observation sessions of Lulie Street, Abbotsford, conducted over a one week period in late August.

20141002 lulie street traffic #1

The traffic survey identified the number of vehicles, bicycles and pedestrians passing through, arriving at or departing the street. The direction in which people were traveling was recorded; towards the Eastern Freeway (north bound) or towards Johnston Street (south bound). More detailed information was also collected, including the average time spent in the street and the average speed at which people were passing through. The accompaniment of pets and prams was also noted.


Image source

  1. Traffic survey data, copyright the author.

Palmer Street traffic analysis

Traffic Analysis

I observed and counted all traffic passing through Palmer Street during the following periods:

  • Weekday morning peak
  • Weekday evening peak
  • Weekday daytime
  • Weekday night time
  • Weekend daytime
  • Weekend night time

Traffic counted includes:

  • Cars passing through the street (including direction and speed)
  • Bicycles
  • Pedestrians
  • Activities of cars and pedestrians e.g. parking, residential use

The peak period of use of the street is heavily influenced by the school day of Sacred Heart School, located on the corner of Palmer and Nicholson Streets. A large number of parents were observed picking up and dropping off their children. Many students also use the street on foot to walk to and from school.

20141001 palmer street traffic #1

Weekday morning peak
7.30am
Clear, 15km/h wind, 10 degrees

Cars: 87
Bicycles: 7
Pedestrians: 182
Pets and motorbikes: 0

20141001 palmer street traffic #2

Weekday daytime
9.30am
Sunny, 15km/h wind, 17 degrees

Cars: 40
Bicycles: 12
Pedestrians: 60
Pets and motorbikes: 4

20141001 palmer street traffic #3

Weekday afternoon peak
3pm
Sunny, 15km/h wind, 20 degrees

Cars: 80
Bicycles: 6
Pedestrians: 151
Pets and motorbikes: 0

20141001 palmer street traffic #4

Weekday night time
6pm
Light rain, 18km/h wind, 13 degrees

Cars: 38
Bicycles: 2
Pedestrians: 68
Pets and motorbikes: 0

20141001 palmer street traffic #5

Weekend daytime
10am
Sunny, 10km/h wind, 19 degrees

Cars: 20
Bicycles: 3
Pedestrians: 55
Pets and motorbikes: 0

20141001 palmer street traffic #6

Weekend night time
6pm
Clear, 13km/h wind, 14 degrees

Cars: 38
Bicycles: 2
Pedestrians: 68
Pets and motorbikes: 0

A summary of this information is as follows:

Overall

Print

Speed and frequency

20141001 palmer street traffic #8

  • Cars travel at an average speed of 20 km/h.
  • Cars spend on average 13.5 seconds in the street as many of them enter at Nicholson Street and turn off immediately after the school down Royal Lane.
  • Low bicycle use.
  • The dominant use of the street is by pedestrians (large number and more frequently).

20141001 palmer street traffic #9

  • Pedestrians move more quickly during peak periods than off-peak periods.
  • Bicycle speed remain constant across both periods.
  • Car spend more time on the street during peak periods, due to parents finding parking spots to wait for their children.
  • Cars use the street more frequently during peak periods than off-peak periods.

Street usage

20141001 palmer street traffic #10

20141001 palmer street traffic #11

  • The majority of traffic uses the section of the street between Nicholson Street and Royal Lane. This is likely due to the street being used as a shortcut to avoid the Nicholson Street / Victoria Parade intersection to the south.
  • Only 0.01% of traffic originates from Little Fleet Street, considered therefore as a dead end street.

Image sources

  1. Weekday morning peak, this and subsequent images copyright of author.
  2. Weekday daytime.
  3. Weekday afternoon peak.
  4. Weekday night time.
  5. Weekend daytime.
  6. Weekend night time.
  7. Traffic summary.
  8. Speed and frequency.
  9. Peak vs. off-peak.
  10. Pedestrian routes.
  11. Car routes.

Rushall Crescent traffic analysis

The traffic analysis for Rushall Crescent was collated over a one week period and consisted of 6x 1 hour observation sessions, collecting data for Rushall Crescent’s car, bike and pedestrian population.

The infographics are designed to be self-explanatory but overall, the results of the traffic analysis underline one significant detail – that the car population of Rushall Crescent is by and large foreign to its local context. Beyond this, no other major anomalies apply. Simply put, the car population of Rushall Crescent relies on it as a means of travel between Queens Parade and St. Georges Road via Park Street and beyond.

20141001 rushall crescent traffic #1

As expected, the above data clearly highlights the car dominance of the street in proportion to bicycles and pedestrians on all occasions. Rushall Crescent is statistically the cars domain. More or less, there is an even distribution in either direction – red bars pertain to traffic headed toward Queens Parade and grey bars pertain to data headed city bound to Park Street. This means that Rushall Crescent doesn’t particularly service cars from one side any more than it does the other. Furthermore, arrival and departure data emphasises car users’ reliance on Rushall Crescent as a major traffic thoroughfare, as only a small percentage of residential traffic (7% total arrivals or departures) make up the overall traffic statistics.

So what does this mean? Rushall Crescent was initially selected for its asymmetric character, variable cross section and for its generous but underutilised 10.5m nature strip on one side. This nature strip, which represents 42% of the total street makeup, was identified as an opportunity to develop “bad” green space. What the traffic analysis brings to the fore however is that while the nature strip lacks value as green space, it works perfectly well as a nature strip by increasing the distance of pedestrians to the high volume of adjacent car traffic.

20141001 rushall crescent traffic #2

Through extrapolation, this image graphically outlines that the only time when there is no more than a single car occupying Rushall Crescent is during weekday nights. Every other time of the week, at least one car enters before the preceding one departs.

20141001 rushall crescent traffic #3

This final image outlines the average stay for cyclists and pedestrians as well as a detailed cross section of the street. The most telling insight pertains to the nature in which bypassing traffic enters and exits the street. In both directions at every observation time, cars more often than not traverse in packs. This further highlights Rushall Crescent as a transitional linkage street for drivers, who access it in time with nearby traffic lights.

Rushall Crescent is predominantly lined with medium density residential dwellings, aside from the lower density retirement village which conveniently sits behind the large 10.5m nature strip. Besides cars, Rushall Crescent also services bus routes #250 and #251 from the city to La Trobe University and Northland Shopping Centre respectively. It is a major traffic linkage, as its consistent traffic survey results show, rather than a convenient rat run for cars. Whilst asphalt does make up 48% of Rushall Crescent’s street makeup, for these reasons as well as a lack of any true anomalies in traffic analysis, it becomes difficult to justify Rushall Crescent as a suitable street for the Streets Without Cars agenda, despite the initial excitement over its wide streets and nature strip.


Image sources

  1. Traffic mapping, this and subsequent images copyright of author.
  2. Traffic analysis.
  3. Traffic infographic.

Richmond carpark traffic conclusions

The surveys of car, bicycle and pedestrian traffic through the carpark located at 36 Thomas Street, Richmond, revealed some interesting conclusions about the site. The diagram below represents the total data collected across all six observation periods When overlaid, patterns of movement and usage begin to emerge.

20140930 richmond carpark traffic conclusions #1

Comparing the diagrams of traffic usage across the day, we can see that the timeframe with the highest use is the peak evening period. Weekday and weekend daytimes also have higher than average usage. However, total numbers of cars using the carpark across the day would be classified as generally low.

20140930 richmond carpark traffic conclusions #2

Parking

  • Overall, the site has a very low usage as a carpark, with an average of only 14 our 74 car parks in use per hour. The peak period for parking is during the day on weekends, particularly on Saturdays. The lowest usage generally occurs on weeknights.
  • Of the cars that do use the site for parking, an overwhelming majority of 84% use the south end of the carpark closest to shops on Bridge Road, compared to only 16% which used the north side.
  • Observations revealed that customers going to the adjacent Thomas Dux supermarket tend to park as close to the south west corner as possible and most do not pay for parking as they only use the carpark for a short period of time.

Pedestrians

The path of movement which most pedestrians take is from the pedestrian lane (leading to Bridge Road) cutting through the carpark on a diagonal and exiting at the corner of Thomas and Hull Streets.

Durations

The average duration of time spent in the carpark by pedestrians is 43 seconds, compared with 10 seconds for cars.

These conclusions will be used together with the community consultation outcomes to begin to create a masterplan for the site.


Image sources

  1. Total traffic overlay, this and following image copyright of author.
  2. Traffic use by period.

Richmond carpark traffic analysis

In order to gauge the current usage of the Richmond carpark located at 36 Thomas Street, a series of observation sessions were conducted across a variety of timeframes. The sessions each lasted 1 hour and were undertaken over a two week period in September. The numbers of cars, pedestrians, bicycles, pets and prams were counted during each session. More detailed information was also collected, including the locations of parking, and both the directions and durations of movement. The data has been collated below.

20140930 richmond carpark traffic #1

20140930 richmond carpark traffic #2

20140930 richmond carpark traffic #3

20140930 richmond carpark traffic #4

20140930 richmond carpark traffic #5

20140930 richmond carpark traffic #6


Image sources

  1. Weekday morning peak, this and subsequent images copyright of author.
  2. Weekend evening peak.
  3. Weekday daytime.
  4. Weekday night time.
  5. Weekend day time.
  6. Weekend night time.