Planting preferences

In September 2003, Thompson Berrill Landscape Design undertook community consultation on behalf of the City of Yarra in relation to street planting masterplans that were proposed at the time. Interviews were received from 85 residents within the Carlton North area, each of whom responded to the following statements:

  1. Existing residential streets without trees will received a higher priority for planting.
  2. In east / west orientated streets, a mix of evergreen and deciduous trees are proposed to retain sunlight in winter to properties on the south side of the street.
  3. Native and indigenous trees have been included in streets near the Yarra River and Merri Creek.
  4. In narrow streets with older style Victorian character, predominantly deciduous trees are proposed to complement their character and retain sunlight in winter.
  5. Where new trees are proposed in roadside cut-outs, consultation with the local community will be undertaken prior to planting to confirm street tree locations and their impact on parking capacity and access.
  6. Where new trees are interplanted with existing trees in footpaths and naturestrips, no further consultation with the community will be undertaken prior to planting.

Responses to the statements were:

20131121 planting q1 and q2

20131121 planting q3 and q4

20131121 planting q5 and q6

While these questions do not relate specifically to the context of Drummond Street, they provide insight into the community’s strong preferences for:

  • A balance between evergreen and deciduous trees to permit the penetration to street level of winter sunlight.
  • A balance between native and introduced trees to acknowledge both the indigenous character of Merri Creek and Victorian character of the terrace dwelling typology.
  • Community consultation on the types and locations of new trees.

Image sources:

  1. Question 1 and 2. Information for this and subsequent images sourced from report prepared by Thompson Berrill Landscape Design on behalf of the City of Yarra. Copyright Mihaly Slocombe.
  2. Question 3 and 4.
  3. Question 5 and 6.

 

Community consultation in progress

20131119 702 drummond

20131119 706 drummond

An essential part of Streets Without Cars is the input we receive from our local community. First and foremost, we want to find out who you are: whether you’re sharehousing or raising a family; how many cars and bicycles you own; how you get to work or school each day; what access you have to outdoor facilities and how you currently use them. We also want the brief for our design to be crowdsourced from your thoughts and suggestions. This will share ownership of the project amongst, as well as better tailor its design to, the community who will benefit from it.

Excluding our own, there are 39 houses along Drummond Street within the site area, all of whose residents we hope to interview. So far, we have spoken with 19 of you and have already started to see some common desires. A few of the many interesting ideas we have received include:

“We could use the street for energy generation and water storage.”
Zelda, architect

“I’d like to see more plants, including trees on the sidewalks.”
Shane, chef

“I like the peacefulness and flexibility of the current median strip.”
Mary-ann, nurse

“Looking at a green environment, even when not actually in it, is relaxing.”
Rupert, high-school teacher

“Green development would contribute to house prices.”
Rosie, salesperson

“I’d like to see road safety training for children.”
Rachel, mother

“Hot springs would encourage me to use the space all year round.”
Meg, graphic designer

“Community barbecues would reinforce the village feel of Carlton North.”
Nathan, online marketer

“Fruit trees would be great at harvest time.”
Andjelka, mother and in finance

“I’d like a space for sitting, eating and beering.”
Carly, medical student

“It could be like Curtain Square, only more local and spontaneous.”
Amy, nursing student

“I’d like to do something creative, make something and give back to the community.”
Chris, photography student

“An open backyard for everyone.”
James, electrical engineering student

“Activating the street edges is important.”
Darcy, builder

“I like to chase the last afternoon sunlight.”
Ben, food-safety consultant

“I would like more grass and more plants.”
Caroline, media and communications student

“Space inside our terrace is limited, so I’d use it for larger social events and entertaining.”
Vanessa, mother and graphic designer

“Street festivals would be good, so we can meet our neighbours.”
Nic, architect

If you’d like to include your own suggestions, or if we’ve already interviewed you and would like to offer some more, please fee free to download our interview template. Print it out, fill it in, and either email it back to us or drop it off at our studio, 698 Drummond Street.


Image sources:

  1. 702 Drummond Street. Copyright Mihaly Slocombe.
  2. 706 Drummond Street. Copyright Mihaly Slocombe.

Traffic conclusions

Our surveys of car, bicycle and pedestrian traffic along the section of Drummond Street between Curtain and Fenwick Streets identified three significant patterns.

20131117 traffic overall

First is the overall picture. The street has light traffic flow and low speed car usage, and is well used by both bicycles and pedestrians.[1]

  • 1,592 cars use the street per day. We observed one car journey every 54 seconds, driving at an average speed of 38km/hr.
  • 399 bicycles use the street per day. We observed one bicycle journey every 216 seconds, riding at an average speed of 26km/hr.
  • 1,071 pedestrians use the street per day. We observed one pedestrian journey every 81 seconds, walking at an average speed of 6km/hr.
  • In every hour, cars spend 14 minutes driving through the street, each taking on average 12 seconds to travel between Curtain and Fenwick Streets.
  • In every hour, bicycles spend 5 minutes riding through the street, each taking on average 18 seconds to travel between Curtain and Fenwick Streets.
  • In every hour, pedestrians spend 54 minutes walking through the street, each taking on average 72 seconds to travel between Curtain and Fenwick Streets.

20131117 traffic peak

Second, is the difference between peak periods and off peak periods. Both car and bicycle traffic are significantly heavier during peak periods, particularly heading south towards the city during the weekday morning peak. Pedestrian traffic is fairly constant.

  • In off peak periods, we observed one car journey every 75 seconds travelling at an average speed of 36km/hr.
  • In peak periods, we observed one car journey every 17 seconds travelling at an average speed of 44km/hr.
  • In off peak periods, we observed one bicycle journey every 306 seconds travelling at an average speed of 20km/hr.
  • In peak periods, we observed one bicycle journey every 66 seconds travelling at an average speed of 29km/hr.
  • Pedestrian traffic is generally consistent. We observed one pedestrian journey every 81 seconds travelling at an average speed of 6km/hr.

0022 traffic arrivals

And third is the percentage of journeys that start or finish within the site area, compared with those that pass through. Only a small percentage of car, bicycle and pedestrian journeys start or finish within the site area.

  • 12% of car journeys are arrivals or departures. We observed 188 arrivals and departures per day, of 1,592 cars total.
  • 10% of bicycle journeys are arrivals or departures. We observed 41 arrivals and departures per day, of 399 bicycles total.
  • 27% of pedestrian journeys are arrivals or departures. We observed 287 arrivals and departures per day, of 1,071 pedestrians total.

So, the conclusions our research and analysis have allowed us to reach:

  • Drummond Street is subject to light car traffic. It is well used by bicycles and pedestrians.
  • Car and bicycle usage during peak periods are significantly higher than off peak periods. Pedestrian use is consistent.
  • A small percentage of car, bicycle and pedestrian journeys start or finish within the site area.

Footnotes:

[1] According to research undertaken by Donald Appleyard, light traffic flow equates to 2,000 vehicles per day and heavy traffic flow equates to 16,000 vehicles per day. Donald Appleyard; Liveable Streets; University of California Press; Berkeley; 1981

Image sources:

  1. Overall picture. Information collated for all images by, and copyright belongs to, Mihaly Slocombe.
  2. Peak and off-peak.
  3. Arrivals and departures.

Traffic surveys

The following data was collected during 6x 1 hour observation sessions of the site, undertaken over a two week period in late October. During each session, the numbers of cars, bicycles and pedestrians were counted. More detailed information was also collected, including the average time taken to travel between Fenwick and Curtain Streets (or vice versa), arrivals and departures, direction of travel, and accompaniment by dogs or prams.

20131108 traffic 20121009

Weekday daytime
Wednesday 9th October
11.00am – 12.00pm
18 degrees, clear skies, strong winds
106 total journeys

20131108 traffic 20121012

Weekend daytime
Saturday 12th October
3.35 – 4.45pm
25 degrees, clear skies, light winds
122 total journeys

20131108 traffic 20121014

Weekday morning peak
Monday 14th October
8.10 – 9.10am
9 degrees, overcast
468 total journeys

20131108 traffic 20121017

Weekday evening peak
Thursday 17th October
5.00 – 6.00pm
14 degrees, sunny
179 total journeys

20131108 traffic 20121023

Weekday night time
Wednesday 23rd October
8.05 – 9.05pm
14 degrees, cloudy, light winds
90 total journeys

20131108 traffic 20121026

Weekend night time
Saturday 26th October
7.45 – 8.45pm
14 degrees, partially cloudy, light winds
100 total journeys


Image sources:

  1. Weekday daytime. Information for all images collated by, and copyright belongs to, Mihaly Slocombe.
  2. Weekend daytime.
  3. Weekday morning peak.
  4. Weekday evening peak.
  5. Weekday night time.
  6. Weekend night time.

The site

20131105 site plan

The site boundary for Streets Without Cars is the 130m section of Drummond Street in Carlton North running between Curtain Street to the south and Fenwick Street to the north. Shakespeare Lane, a narrow oneway lane running from Lygon Street, enters Drummond Street from the west.

There are 40 dwellings fronting onto the street, with a mixture of one and two storey terraces. The street is 28m wide, 14m of which is dedicated to north and south bound car and bicycle lanes, and parallel car parking. The footpaths are 3m wide with no plantings. A 10m wide central median strip comprises lawn and a row of young and mature Oak trees.

The property highlighted black, 698 Drummond Street, is the location of our studio, Mihaly Slocombe.


Image source:

  1. The site. Copyright Mihaly Slocombe.